WE LIVED IT AND LAUGHED

It is possible to make your publishing dreams come true! Read this inspiring post about one of my clients.

P.C. Zick - Author/Editor

FINAL CoverIt gives me great pleasure to announce the release of We Lived It and Laughed – Tales of Chuluota, Florida by Mark Perrin. This book of personal essays recounts life in the seventies while growing up in rural Florida.

I ran into Mark about six weeks ago while I was sitting at a book booth in Tallahassee trying to sell books. He had a notebook with him, and he wanted to ask some questions about publishing. He said he had some true stories from his youth he wanted to publish. I mentioned that I was an editor as well as an author, and further, I could help him take his manuscript from Word to a published book.

And here we are a few weeks laters with those essays now published in a lovely book of humorous tales from a time and place very far removed from where most of us…

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Dealing with writing limitations : post by Michael Dellert #IWSG

Here on Daily (w)rite, as part of the guest post series, it is my absolute pleasure today to welcome Michael Dellert, author, editor, friend, who has imparted his nuggets of wisdom at this space before– here , here, and here. Today he talks about how writers can handle their limitations during rewr

Source: Dealing with writing limitations : post by Michael Dellert #IWSG

“Re-visioning into Romance” By P. C. Zick

Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

One of my favorite things to do is to introduce authors who I consider to be exceptional writers and story tellers. Please meet my friend and author, P. C. Zick.

“Revisions are a part of the writing process for all authors, but it took a “re-vision” of my writing life to give me a new passion for my work.”

It all happened when I joined an online romance writing class several years ago. Curiosity brought me to the course because I felt stalled with my next project. I occasionally read romances, but had never considered writing one. Even after I enrolled, I considered it a lark that might spark inspiration for a new novel, but not one in the romance genre.

Up until the class, I wrote contemporary fiction and created my own form of eco-journalism within the novel form. That sounds rather snooty, doesn’t it? Someone described it that way…

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P. C. ZICK – Still Waters Run Deep

Lovely post from S.R. Mallery who makes it easy to be an editor.

S.R. Mallery's AND HISTORY FOR ALL

 I first met this versatile, super-talented writer and life-saving editor through ASMSG (Author Social Media Support Group). Through it, we knew each other only peripherally, but that all changed when I reached out and hired her as an editor/formatter for my first two books. Having had them originally published through a small press, I told her I needed help in becoming an Indie author. Her response was immediate and highly supportive. Indeed, she became nothing short of invaluable to me, as she took the time to explain basic editorial things such as POV and character development, as well as how to upload my books onto Amazon and Draft2Digital. I soon came to realize that being under her calm, steady tutelage was as if I’d gone to back to college as a writing major and snagged the best professor.

In time, the more I got to know her, the…

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TORTOISE STEW – WHERE FACT AND FICTION MEET

Most writers pull ideas from real life to begin novels. This is what happened to me when I wrote Tortoise Stew. Just remember, to change names and circumstances so they don’t resemble too closely the reality.

P.C. Zick - Author/Editor

Sometimes the muse leads us where we need to go. In early 2002, I was working on a novel set on the Suwanee River. I was also a reporter for a 5,000 circulation weekly newspaper in north Florida. I covered one of the more contentious city commissions as WalMart began doing what WalMart does best – disrupt small town America.

One Tuesday morning in February, I made my rounds of the local city police departments to pick up the police reports for the past week before heading to the newspaper’s office. When I turned the corner, police tape encircled the building, and I saw my coworkers wandering around outside.

“Don’t worry – no one was hurt,” the publisher said as he rushed toward me when I got out of my car. “They were able to detonate the bomb before anything happened.”

                 …

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Library Writers’ Group: Revising

Taking on a World of Words

I’ve told you all before how amazing my friend Kristine Kruppa is, right? She led our writers’ group this month and talked about the revision process, using a lot of her experiences from revising her novel and giving me some good insight on the revisions she just gave me for my manuscript. I’m excited to share with you some things we learned.

First, revising and editing are different in a very notable way. Editing implies line editing, looking at structure and grammar and improving it. Revising comes earlier in the process and is on a story-level. You have to revise before editing or else your edits might get revised away. After finishing the first draft, leave the story for about a week or so to get some distance from it. Then do a read-through and start the revision process.

The first thing to look for is characters. Could any be…

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A Little Hook

Here’s some great advice. Study the first lines of the classics, and you’ll see how they grab the reader.

Lit World Interviews

Every writer has his or her own process. Ideas come, sometimes in the form of virtual Mack trucks that appear out of nowhere, usually at the most inopportune of times, creating the need for you to stop whatever it is that you’re doing and run away to write all that good stuff down before it disappears back to wherever it was that it came from. Kind of thing that gets us scribblers labeled as odd, at the very least. The inspiration for new stories is the easy part of writing—I have PILES of fabulous story outlines that are unlikely to ever see the light of day. Getting them going is what’s needed for them ever to become real books. Just those few first paragraphs are often all that we need to give us the push to write on through to the end.

Those first paragraphs are probably the most important…

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Editing is my LIFE!

Good advice for all writers!

Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

My life consists of reading and writing, and re-writing words in the hopes of publishing my novel by this autumn…

If you don’t see me around much, that is why. Writing is a journey…

I did find some great editing tips, and I have shared them below:

Image credit: TheWriteLife.com

Check out this article: FREE APPS EVERY WRITER SHOULD BE USING

HAPPY EDITING!

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR EDITING HELP THAT IS AFFORDABLE?

LET ME INTRODUCE YOU TO THE MANUSCRIPT DOCTOR! She can help! ❤

Manuscript Dr pat zickhttps://pczickeditor.wordpress.com/services/  Click this link and Patricia will fix you up!

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Writing Tips: Eliminate Redundancies | Writing Forward

Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

I share articles that help me on my journey to writing a better novel. I hope they will help you also. If we don’t practice, we don’t learn. This is excellent information! ❤

Eliminate redundancies to improve your writing. Writers are human, and sometimes we make mistakes. You’re probably aware of the most common mistakes in

Source: Writing Tips: Eliminate Redundancies | Writing Forward

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